Faculty of Pharmacy

 

Location

The Faculty of Pharmacy
ul.Muszyńskiego 1,
90 - 151 Łódź, Poland
tel. 677-91-14, tel./fax: +48 42 678-83-98

Authorities

Dean
Prof. Elżbieta Mikiciuk-Olasik, PD, PhD
tel. 042 677 91 14, 042 677 91 17
Vice Dean for Teaching
Prof. Justyn Ochocki, PD, PhD
tel. 042 677 91 14, 042 677 91 17
Vice Dean for Didactics
Prof. Andrzej Wróblewski, MD, PhD
tel. 042 677 91 14, 042 677 91 17
Vice Dean for the Laboratory Medicine Division
Prof. Janina Grzegorczyk, MD, PhD
tel. 042 677 91 14, 042 677 91 17
Vice Dean for the Division of Postgraduate Training
Prof. Eligia Szewczyk, MD, PhD
tel. 042 677 91 14, 042 677 91 17
Vice Dean for the Higher School of Cosmetology
Krzysztof Walczyński, PD, PhD
tel. 042 677 91 14, 042 677 91 17

General Information

The Faculty of Pharmacy was created in 1945 by ordinance of the Ministry of Education, as a unit of the University of Lodz. In 1947 it was incorporated - together with the Medical Faculty- into the newly created Medical University (or Medical Academy). In 1972 the Faculty of Pharmacy acquired a new abode composed of the main building, a medicinal plant garden and an animal house.

From the very beginning the Faculty educated professionals of health care, the pharmacists. In 1977 the Division of Medical Analytics was created, which in 1998 was renamed as the Division of Laboratory Medicine. This division replaced the originally existing course of clinical analytics within the framework of pharmaceutical education. In 1996, on the basis of the Faculty, Higher School of Cosmetology was created.

Throughout the over 50 years of existence, the Faculty of Pharmacy was directed by subsequent ten deans, who - with support of over 20 v-deans, ensured of high level of education, scientific development and good reputation of the Faculty. Until year 2003 at the Faculty of Pharmacy 5.211 undergraduates have obtained their degrees of Master of Science in Pharmacy, 457 in Medical Analytics, and 199 the licentiate in Cosmetology. In the academic year 2002/2003, the total number of students at the Faculty of Pharmacy was 972.

The Structure of the Faculty

The Faculty of Pharmacy is composed of the following units:
Chair of Bioorganic and Biocoordination Chemistry
Chair Medical Chemistry
Chair of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Biochemistry
Chair of Toxicology and Food Sciences
Chair of Biology and Pharmaceutical Biotechnology
Chair of Pharmacognosy
Chair of Applied Pharmacy
Chair of Biopharmacy

The structure as well as names of all Faculty of Pharmacy units, telephones, e-mails are available from:www.umed.lodz.pl

Teaching at the Faculty of Pharmacy

Pharmaceutical Courses

Teaching aims at comprehensive preparation of the candidates to the pharmaceutical profession. The latter comprises the traditional pharmacist (drug store pharmacy) and also the analyst involved in drug analysis and bioanalysis, environmental analyst and also the drug technologist. The principal area of competence, however, is the preparation of drugs at the drug store, participation in the production of medicines in industry, as well as analysis, standardizing, preservation and distribution of medicines.
Studying pharmacy takes 5 years, i.e. 10 semesters, of which the last one is devoted a research project, M.Sc. thesis. Following accreditation in all courses and apprenticeships, the acceptance of the research project and passing the final examination, the student acquires the professional title of M.Sc. in Pharmacy.

The curriculum at the initial courses entails general subjects, in this number also humanistic courses and mathematics, as well as basic courses in chemistry, biology and propedeutics of medicine. The third to fifth years of study are aimed at specialistic teaching of more strictly pharmaceutical subjects, such as drug chemistry, pharmacognosy, applied pharmacy, technology of drug forms, pharmacodynamics, synthesis and biosynthesis of medicines, toxicology, food science, biochemistry and microbiology. During the fourth year of studies the curriculum differentiates into four directions: pharmaceutical and environmental analysis, drug store pharmacy and the technology of drugs and cosmetics. The students select one of these directions depending on their talents, interests and job opportunities.

The course of pharmaceutical and environmental analytics

The course of pharmaceutical and environmental analytics gives emphasis to the methods of chemical, physicochemical and toxicological analysis of medicines and food products. It also comprises lessons in computerised analytical techniques. The graduates find employment in laboratories of the health service, sanitary-epidemiological service, food control laboratories, and analytical laboratories in the pharmaceutical industry.

The course of drug store pharmacy

The course of drug store pharmacy prepares candidates to open - and hospital drug stores. The emphasis is given to the applied pharmacy and technology of drug forms. It also introduces the economic and legal aspects of pharmacy. Besides drug-stores, the graduates seek employment in the drug wholesale firms, pharmaceutical supervision units and drug information units.

The course of clinical pharmacy

The course of clinical pharmacy has an extended program in matters of biopharmacy, medicine, pharmacology, clinical biochemistry as well as pathophysiology and toxicology. It prepares specialists in drug biomonitoring, as well as the staff of diagnostic laboratories of hospitals, sanitary-epidemiological stations and blood donor stations.

The course of pharmaceutical technology

The course of pharmaceutical technology extends the knowledge of students in matters of industrial instrumentation, chemical engineering, technology of drugs, flavours and biotechnology of medicines. The graduates are prepared in matters of production and control of medicines, para-pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. The graduates of all directional courses in pharmacy are legalized for drug-store work. They also get employed as representatives of national and international pharmaceutical firms. The most talented graduates interested in science may seek employment in research institutes of universities and other institutions. Many have opportunities to make careers in science.

Teaching at the Division of Laboratory Medicine

The objective of teaching is to prepare professionals in laboratory medicine. The graduates are prepared to specialize further in various fields of laboratory medicine, such as clinical biochemistry, hematology, immunopatology, serology, clinical microbiology, parasitology, cytogenetics, toxicology or nuclear medicine.During the first and second year the curriculum includes a complex of basic subjects in chemistry, biochemistry and medical propedeutics. In the years two to five specialistic teaching is offered in general pathology, clinical biochemistry, hematology, microbiology, toxicology, serology, isotope and laboratory diagnostics. During the fifth year of studies, a training concerns basic clinical subjects, such as internal medicine, pediatrics, and intensive medical care. Teaching of the basic clinical subjects aims at recognising fundamental diagnostic processes as well as the role of laboratory medicine in the diagnosis.

The graduate of the Division of Laboratory Medicine is well prepared for work in the diagnostic laboratories of hospitals and dispensaries, as well as blood donor stations and sanitary-epidemiological stations. He (or She) is also prepared for work in scientific units in the above field.

The curriculum in medical analytics takes 5 years, i.e. 10 semesters, of which the last one is devoted to a research project for M.Sc. Following a credit in all courses, acceptance of the research project and passing the final examination, the student acquires the professional title of M.Sc. in Medical Analytics.

Teaching at the Higher School of Cosmetology

The Higher School of Cosmetology was established on the organisational basis of the Faculty of Pharmacy in 1996. The complex program of teaching is executed by teaching staff of both faculties of the Medical University.

The basic objective of the School is to prepare professional staff for the beauty parlours. The graduates of the School are also prepared to work as consultants in cosmetic firms, and - in the future - also as professional teaching staff in cosmetology.

The curriculum comprises both, the general education courses and specialistic courses essential for the cosmetic profession. Among the former, realized during the first year of teaching, are: human anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology and histology as well as the chemistry of cosmetic raw materials; the remaining two years are devoted to specialistic subjects such as: cosmetology, physiotherapy, the technology of the forms of cosmetics, dermatology, immunology and allergology. The curriculum also contains an intensive apprenticeship, executed at the basis of own well equipped cosmetic laboratory, as well as at other renowned beauty parlours. The graduates (licentiates) of the Higher School of Cosmetology get prepared both, theoretically and practically for the self-dependent activity of a cosmetitian. The professional studies in cosmetology take 3 years. Following accreditation in all courses, acceptance of the diploma thesis, and the final examination, the graduate receives the professional title of a licentiate in cosmetology.

Division of Postgraduate Training

The Division of Postgraduate Training was established in 1996 on the basis of organisational units of the Faculty. Teaching activities are performed by the staff of several units of the Faculty, and in some cases are based on the co-operation with other specialistic laboratories. The postgraduate training is directed towards pharmacists and physicians. The educational activity of the Faculty is supported by the Program Council, which approves the program and the methodology.

The postgraduate training is executed in four areas (directions):

Training in drug store pharmacy aims at the Io grade of specialization and consists of both theoretical courses and practical training. A yearly cycle of lectures covers the theoretical aspects of a drug store pharmacy. The progress of up-to-date prescription is addressed by 5- day practical courses. Another 5 day course addresses the specialistic training in prenatal drugs. Finally, two-day courses cover the problem of drug control in the drug-store. The training in the above field comprises about 100 persons per year.
Training in homeopathy is addressed to both pharmacists and physicians. Courses are organized in co-operation with the representatives of Laboratoire Boiron, and the number of persons trained exceeds 100 per year.

Several dozen pharmacists are trained yearly in matters of distribution and turnover of medical and pharmaceutical stuff outside the drug - store network. In coordination with the chief Pharmaceutical Inspectorate and the Department of Pharmacy Ministry of Health and Welfare, training of pharmaceutical inspectors is also undertaken.
The scientific activity

Besides teaching, scientific research is the main professional activity of the staff of the Faculty. This activity may be evaluated by the number of acquired scientific degrees and titles as well as the number of articles published in scientific journals. In the last five years 27 D.Sc. degrees were acquired, alongside with 8 higher degrees (dr hab. or Ph.D.). The title of professor was endowed to 8 scientists.

SCIENTIFIC DEGREES AND THE TITLE (1998 - 2002)

 

First degree (D.Sc.)

Higher degree (Ph.D.)

Title of Professor

1998

9

2

1

1999

6

3

1

2000

4

1

2

2001

5

1

2

2002

3

1

2

The overall number of papers published yearly in 1998-2002 exceeded 240, of which 1/2 were full original papers mostly published in renowned international scientific journals. The scientists of the Faculty also take an active part in congresses organised in the country or abroad and there are over 100 of such presentations yearly.
International Cooperation

The Faculty of Pharmacy is in contact with scientific institutions and individual scientists of a variety of foreign Universities and research institutes. This stimulates the scientific development, especially if the progress requires access to modern methods and equipment. In the framework of such co-operation the staff members of the Faculty acquire fellowships (e.q. postdoctoral) of renowned universities and also participate in the presentations of visiting scientists. To some extent such co-operation, with regard to specific projects, can also take place by correspondence, through an exchange of data.
In the years 1996-2003 the Faculty of Pharmacy co-operated with the following research institutions:

The overall number of papers published yearly in 1998-2002 exceeded 240, of which 1/2 were full original papers mostly published in renowned international scientific journals. The scientists of the Faculty also take an active part in congresses organised in the country or abroad and there are over 100 of such presentations yearly.
International Cooperation

The Faculty of Pharmacy is in contact with scientific institutions and individual scientists of a variety of foreign Universities and research institutes. This stimulates the scientific development, especially if the progress requires access to modern methods and equipment. In the framework of such co-operation the staff members of the Faculty acquire fellowships (e.q. postdoctoral) of renowned universities and also participate in the presentations of visiting scientists. To some extent such co-operation, with regard to specific projects, can also take place by correspondence, through an exchange of data.
In the years 1996-2003 the Faculty of Pharmacy co-operated with the following research institutions:

1.Geselschaft fur Biotechnologische Forschung (Braunschweig, Germany)
2.The University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, UK)
3.University of Potchefstroom (Republic of South Africa)
4.Vrije Universiteit (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
5.Cancer Center Science Park (Smithvill, USA)
6.University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (Denver, USA)
7.Institut fur Pharmaceutische Biologie, Heinrich-Hein Universitat (Dusseldorf, Germany)
8.University of Rochester (New York, USA)
9.University of Surrey (Guilford, UK)
10.Institut fur Pharmaceutische Chemie der Universitat Munich (Munich, Germany)
11.University of Dortmund (Dortmund, Germany)
12.University of Nijmegen (Netherlands)
13.University of Connecticut (USA)
14.Iowa state University (USA)
15.Kantonsspital, Div. Haematology (St. Gallen, Switzerland)
16.University of Tiantin (China)
17.Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research (Italy)
18.Ludwig Maximilians University (Germany)
19.San Diego State University (USA)
20.Catholic University of Lille (France)
21.Industry of Libera (Nowe Mesto, Slovakia)
22.University of Bratislava (Slovakia)
23.Department of Pharmacy, WHO